Persevere with perseverance

We avid doers aren’t afraid of doing things to get things done. We know what we want and we know what to do to get it. We roll up our sleeves and through grit and determination (and sometimes a bit of stubbornness) we do what is necessary to achieve our goals.

Nothing breaks our spirit…well, assuming it happens in the time we anticipate.

In our quest for managing our careers and developing our professional skills, the excitement of achieving our goals can sometimes be hampered by not managing our expectations. If the results aren’t as expected (whether it’s outcome, or time, or focus etc.) we lose perseverance, we have a change of heart and question whether to carry on or not.

Or is it just me?

Personal reflection

I am notoriously impatient; always have been, always will be. It has its advantages but in terms of perseverance, my impatience somethings gets the better of me and makes me question my efforts in relation to my goals.

The other weekend I had a good sort out of my, what-I-call ‘Cupboard of Broken Dreams’, a shame-filled pit of ex-passions and dropped-hobbies.

My painting easel. My photography equipment. My massage table. My Reiki books. My keyboard piano.

All the things that I once loved but struggled to conjure up enough perseverance to keep them going.

Don’t get me wrong; from each of these I have developed a number of useful transferable skills to my career.

There are a few I’m particularly proud of – my painting took me to exhibit in London’s Mall Galleries (and coming runner up), write and publish a book, and be the subject matter of someone’s GCSE project.

There are a few I still take up every now and then – I still enjoy playing the odd tune on the piano, and my friends and I still reap the benefits of a Reiki blast every now and then.

I also enjoy taking photos, and for those who follow my personal account on Instagram will see I love taking photos of homemade dishes and the countryside here in the Peak District.

Have you noticed my photographs in the last couple of posts as their featured image (the image that is displayed when it is shared on Twitter or LinkedIn)?

This was following a re-evaluation of The Avid Doer blog. The visitor count to this is good (and global!) but after nine months of it being up and running, I really want the audience to be wider, to help as many fellow go-get’em professionals as possible.

After doing some research it turns out that people like to share posts on social media that have a nice accompanying image – my posts came with generic and boring imagery that quite frankly wouldn’t encourage anyone to share at all.

So having a rethink, I’ve now combined my enjoyment of taking photos with my passion for professional development by using my photos as the featured image for each Avid Doer post.

Perseverance

This got me thinking about the importance of perseverance. Once you have a career end goal (or goals) in mind, and the right amount of professional motivation, you also need that perseverance.

Persevering with something is the difference between instant relief (letting go of something you’re struggling with, like job hunting) and knowing that you will one day be thankful for not giving up (like finding the perfect job following struggle).

Time is a constant. You can’t control it. It will happen whether or not you’re paying attention.

When you lack perseverance for achieving a professional goal, time doesn’t pause to let you try a different way. You don’t want to persevere because you feel you aren’t getting the results you have anticipated and planned for. So you give up.

But when you give up, time still carries on. That same time that you felt wasn’t going to come by when you wanted that instant assurance.

To give you example, perhaps you want to learn a specific skill like project management. You want to be seen as competent project manager and have a skill that will be higher in demand the more organisations continue to adopt the project management approach in conducting business.

Only the topic is quite tedious. There are three levels you need to complete before you even have a chance to be a full member of one of the project management bodies, APM. You can even self-study, which is still a lot of work and a lot of time.

Possibly in about 12 to 18 months of hard work and knowledge retention, you might achieve it. You start but slow down half way through because it’s just not going at the pace you thought it would.

Or you decide not to take the course because of the length of time.

Time carries on.

Eighteen months into the future, you’ll still be around (touch wood). The difference will be:

  • You have full membership and a set of useful and practical, transferable skills after successfully completing the required exams
  • You’re still studying but slowly understanding the concepts in order to reach your goal eventually
  • You had given up and settled for an easier life (if you started at all!)

This is where perseverance makes a world of difference to your professional development. You will eventually meet the end of those 18 months, and sure they’ll be hard, but will you have regret, or a sense of satisfaction, accomplishment and pride?

Giving up

Is there any shame in giving up? Not at all, and this relies only on you. If you realise that the course of action you are taking isn’t going the way you planned, or is never going to lead you onto achieving your goal, then ‘giving up’ could be a smart move (this is, of course, after considering whether or not to change you goal or your efforts, as I’ve written about before).

But without coming across too cheesy, persevering in the right circumstances lead you onto bigger things – whether that is by meeting your goal exactly or introducing you to new and exciting opportunities even when the goal isn’t what you expected.

So what are the right circumstances?

Below is a list of ideas you should consider whether or not to persevere:

  • Regardless of the effort needed, will you eventually meet your goal?
  • Are you just looking for an easy way out?
  • Are you jeopardising your career for the sake of an easier route?
  • Have you tried every alternative way of doing something before deciding to quit?
  • Will you regret giving up this time next year?
  • Will you regret not giving up this time next year?
  • What is the impact of giving up (positive and negative)?
  • What is the impact of persevering (positive and negative)?
  • Have you asked for help?

The final point is such an important one (as are most of my bulleted lists – I need some sort of segway into the next paragraph!).

Deciding to persevere or quit comes after a lot of thinking and mulling, and most times to a point of analysis paralysis, where you have thought of every scenario and outcome that now your thinking is just stunned into paralysis or caught in a thought circle.

The best way to prise yourself out of this is asking for help. Talk to someone – your other half, a friend, a close colleague, your mentor, your manager. Sounding out your thoughts to a fresh pair of ears not only helps you articulate your concerns so that you can hear them outside of your noisy head, you get to hear an outsider’s perspective and their thoughts on the matter.

Whether it’s a pep talk, a sympathetic ear, or a stiff (verbal) slap across the face, they might be able to help you see your situation from a different perspective.

If you’re like me and have a million ideas swirling around your head, delegate your thoughts. Offload your snippets of ideas and concerns to someone else who will help you piece them together in a logical and coherent way.

After considering all of these points and understanding the impact of giving up and persevering you should then begin to understand the next steps you need to take. Being an avid doer isn’t enough. We’re happy to slog our guts and get dirty to achieve what we want to achieve, but perseverance helps us through the tough bits and helps keep our avid doing focussed.

I’m definitely persevering with my blog (not that I thought about giving it up!). It makes me happy, it helps and teaches the readers and visitors it does attract, it develops me as a professional, and I’m confident that I will stumble upon more exciting professional opportunities in the future as it already has so far.

Persevere with perseverance – if all the signs point to success one way or another (and yes, even if it’s hard), then it can only be a good thing.