Too many interests to choose a career?

Have you ever found it hard to choose a career because you just have so many interests? Or you’re frightened that you’ve gone from obsessive hobby to the next, you’re hesitant to commit to a single interest in case next month you would have moved onto something else? Have people often commented that you have an eclectic set of skills and ‘there’s no end to your talents’?

This can be frustrating for the fellow avid doer. We have the energy to devote our efforts into something that will build a flourishing career, but with so many interests, most seemingly completely unrelated, choosing one proves difficult. Moreover, the fear of choosing the wrong one is just as bad.

I spoke about how there is no perfect career for everyone in my last post so it’s important to remember that there is no right way about finding job satisfaction, or in other words, there will never be a perfect solution as it doesn’t exist so therefore mustn’t be ventured for.

So this should give you more room to play with your multiple interests, the number of potential jobs out there that will satisfy you.

Multipotentialites

What better way to begin than to explore the concept of Multipotentialites. For those who aren’t familiar, this is a term and way of thinking developed by Emilie Wapnick who founded the website Puttylike. The ‘Start here’ page, for obvious reasons, is a really good starting point for people with many interests to explore.

Multipotentialites, Emilie explains, are people with multiple interests and creative pursuits. They have no chosen career but instead like to explore as many of their interests as they please. They are also known to learn a new skill or interest, become obsessive about it (it literally takes over their life) and then some time later (a week, a month, a year…) the interest is no longer interesting and they move onto a new creative pursuit.

Now without knowing this concept and the basis that this sort of behaviour is OK, a lot of closeted Multipotentialites will be beating themselves up for flitting from one interest to the next, frustrating not just themselves, but family and friends around them who can’t keep up.

Knowing this inspiring concept has made my transitions from one interest to the next incredibly natural and guilt-free, so I thoroughly recommend hopping over to the website…after you’ve carried on reading this of course.

Indulging in multiple interests

There seems to be an apprehension for indulging your multiple interests especially when you’re determined to focus on your career, but by denying yourself to do this, and explore even more potential interests, you’re not honing the particular set of skills that are wholly unique to you.

Only you have the specific level of competence in a specific combination or related and unrelated skills and hobbies.

Your personal formula

I believe your personal set of skills and competence, or your personal ‘formula’, is the very thing that separates you from the rest when it comes to choosing, perfecting and advancing your career. I talk a lot about transferable skills, so it won’t come as a surprise to you if I said that transferable skills from each of your interests could have a place in devising the career that is uniquely you, plays to your strengths, your weaknesses, your interests, your motivation, your reason to get up in the morning…all of these things that help people love their jobs and in turn progress professionally. This unique formula is one element that creates job satisfaction.

To put it into context, Bob (fictitious) dawdles between a number of jobs that tickles his multiple interests that are seemingly unrelated. He had a try at accountancy, music engineering, law, decoupage, and internal communications. Some might think that Bob is fickle and that he just goes from one job to the next that caters to his multiple interests but doesn’t really help him build a solid foundation on which a fulfilling and progressive career can be built upon.

Sure, Bob is a bit lost and can’t seem to get an ‘A-ha!’ moment where he’s truly found job satisfaction.

But the thing about Bob is, he’s been creating his personal formula. It might be a hodgepodge of skills but come the time he knows what he wants in life, what he wants out of a career, and how to indulge in all of his interests, he has a unique formula that could give him a competitive edge at an interview.

Bob’s formula has profiled him as:

  • Accurate with numbers
  • Attention to detail
  • Creative and capable of thinking outside the box
  • Highly computer literate
  • Intelligent
  • Willing to learn new skills
  • A strong communicator
  • A strong collaborator
  • Eager
  • Not afraid to go for what he wants

Hopefully Bob will figure out what he wants to do with his career, and when he does, he can add qualifications to the formula he has already developed. There might come a time when his certain elements from his formula combine to make him a super-suitable candidate for the job that has seemingly been made for him.

Having multiple interests does not mean you have to pick your favourite and run with it, neglecting the others.

On the contrary, if you have a blatant favourite and you really want to take that off, then that is absolutely fine, but keep a finger on your other interests, even at pastime or hobby level. This helps keep your formula up to speed and keeps it unique. It also means you get more satisfaction out of life in general.

By doing something you enjoy in your spare time, it helps you separate work from home life, the mental or physical muscles you use at work and the ones you use at home. ‘Variety is the spice of life’ they say.

This reflects the danger of falling into the misconception that making money out of each and every interest leads to job satisfaction, or ‘following your bliss’. It’s important to remember that if you happen to enjoy doing something for free, there is no automatic assumption you’ll enjoy doing it for money. For example, as a foodie, I absolutely love to cook, but I couldn’t do it as a job. It’s something I do to unwind from work, an enjoyable hobby that doesn’t have any professional pressure.

I took this same approach when I realised I wanted to start a blog about career development. I’m an HR professional and love all things HR. I could’ve easily started an HR blog but I chose specifically career development because, as well as wanting to help people like me progress professionally, it’s also something I’m really interested in.

So while I develop my skills as an HR professional at work and through CPD (continuous professional development) I get to develop my skills as a blogger and sort of career coach-y person (is that what I am?), on top of the other interests I have. I’ve since gone on to find many elements of HR and career management overlap and one feeds into the other. Even if they didn’t overlap, indulging in my multiple facets that make me me, means I’m forever strengthening my unique formula.

But is there a way of making money from a number of your interests?

Portfolio career

Portfolio careers are essentially working a number of part-time roles, usually 2 or 3 at a time. Not only can this way of working mean you will never have a monotonous week, or ever have to choose one career aspiration to follow, it’s also considered to be a safer way of working in terms of job security. You lose a job? That’s fine, you have two others to fall back on.

Portfolio careers are a better way of networking than if you remained in one job, especially if each of the jobs were in different fields. Just think of what this social asset does to your personal formula!

It does have its pitfalls though, for example making sure schedules are synchronised and switching from one working culture to another all the time can be confusing, but it is an option to consider, a popular one at that.

So please do not worry if you have so many interests that they’re confusing you to the point of frustrated inertia. It’s such a good thing having so many interests and experiences, and it’s a case of deciding how to use these to build a career, and life in general, in the way that suits you.

This is the second of a 5 part series of posts on discovering how to find job satisfaction. Next week, I will be talking about how working cultures can help you in your quest, and the signs to look out for.